BookClique

Here we will post our musings on a wide variety of titles. You can comment on our posts and find the titles in our catalog.

Daisy in Chains by Sharon Bolton

Daisy-in-Chains-blogMaggie Rose is a true crime writer and a lawyer. She uses her experience with the law to find enough doubt about convictions that the conviction is overturned the the prisoner is freed. And, of course, she writes about what she finds to earn her livelihood. Hamish Wolfe is a convicted serial killer, found guilty of murdering three woman and suspected of murdering a fourth. Hamish is convinced that he was wrongly convicted, and sets out to convince Maggie Rose to investigate his case and cast doubt on his guilt. Maggie Rose says no. And of course, Hamish tries harder to convince her.

This is the tale of two clever, interesting, and dynamic people. Both Maggie and Hamish have their own agenda, and their interactions are more like a dance than conversation as they maneuver to achieve their goals. Is Hamish guilty? Is Maggie Rose truly not interested in the case? This is a story where people are not what they seem, and I was kept guessing until the end when the final motives of the characters were revealed.

If you liked Girl on the Train or Gone Girl, then Daisy is Chains is for you. A twisty, intelligent read.

Annette G.


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farm dogsThere’s another fantastic book out from Storey Publishing and it’s Farm Dogs by Janet Dohner.  Any book about farm dogs is probably going to be good but this book is divided into sections on Livestock Guardian Dogs, Herding Dogs, Terrier and earth Dogs, and Multipurpose Farm Dogs.  There are detailed explanations of every breed as far as physical standards, temperament, history of the breed, etc.,  and of course, you cannot help but fall in love with most of the dogs from the pictures!  Do not just naively adopt one of these dogs for their cuteness though – these dogs must have a job to do or they will make their own job (like tearing up your house).  Some of them can be pets also on their off time if they are worked for most of the day but others just are not made to be pets at all.  In addition, you cannot get a herding dog and expect him to also be a guardian and vice versa.  In the world of family pets, adopting from a shelter and getting a crossbreed is very much encouraged and those dogs make fantastic pets-in the working world you have to really do your research and know what kind of dog you are getting.  Again, I cannot say enough about the pictures-I’m partial to the Australian Cattle Dog on page 22 with a muddy face looking like he’s on top of the world he’s so happy and the Australian Kelpie on page 118 who is actually standing on top of his flock of sheep!  One of the things I like about this book is that it blatantly says things like “this breed has no interest in being in a house” or “this breed does not like children”.  If people actually read up on breeds before they adopted them it’s possible a lot of problems would be eliminated!  Highly recommended.

Stacy W.


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A Court of Wings and Ruin by Sarah J. Maas

court of wingsIn A Court of Wings and Ruin the reader starts almost right where the second books ends with Feyre returning to the Spring Court to find out what she can about Tamlin’s alliance with the King of Hybern and to invoke a bit of revenge for what Tamlin has done to her, her family, and all of Prythian by forming such an alliance. As the story unfolds, many past and new characters appear to either help or destroy Prythian’s chance in the coming war against Hybern. Bloody battles ensue, new relationships are forged, and the world and human realm as they know it may crumble. It was hard for me to give a summary of the continuation of the A Court of Thorns and Roses series without giving too much away to fellow readers. I continue to love everything that Sarah J. Maas writes. The Throne of Glass series started my love for all things Sarah and has continued with both of her series and other writings. I fell hard for Feyre’s character; I fell even harder for Rhysand and his relationship with his friends and his relationship with Feyre. I mean, who doesn’t love a bad boy with tattoos who turns out to be the sweetest High Fae of them all?! I think we all need a Rhysand in our life. As I reread the A Court of Thorns and Roses series over and over again, I know I will continue to completely fangirl over the characters and settings and hope Sarah will add more stories about the beloved characters to the universe.

Richelle B.


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Abandon by Meg Cabot

abandonPierce died, then she met a boy. In that exact order. When Pierce first saw and met John Hayden, she thought he was a murderer. She wasn’t entirely wrong, he does take lives, but not in the same sense. After the accident, Pierce is just trying to forget and move on. But, even with a new life, a new town, a new school, John keeps popping up everywhere and always when she needs him the most.
Meg Cabot’s Abandon is a modern retelling of the Greek myth of Persephone and Hades. A young woman resists the decision between life and love all while feeling like she no longer belongs in the world of the living. Starting fresh is a way to help Pierce get her spark back. But the one person who seems to create that fire within her is the last person that should. If she starts falling for John, the darkest of angels, she’ll never get what she wants: her life back. If she lets him, he’ll lead her back into the one place she swore she would never return: The Underworld.

Brittany R.


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Rusty Puppy by Joe Lansdale

rusty puppyRusty Puppy is another hilarious Hap and Leonard novel by Joe Lansdale that is both easy reading and hard to put down.  This time, Hap and Leonard are hired by a black woman to find out the circumstances of her son’s murder.  The son was a good kid who was never involved in anything illegal and a great student but somehow ended up dead in an area he never went that was notorious for illegal drug use.  The area police are completely uninterested, white, and in fact, extremely corrupt.  Hap and Leonard stumble around, ticking off everyone-good and bad-as they try to find out what happened.  Of course, the kid’s murder ends up being just one part of a whole tangled up evil mess which a lot of powerful people make a lot of money off of.  When Hap and Leonard start sticking their noses into things, those same people don’t take it too kindly.  As usual, the conversations are great – I’ve never seen the TV show based on this series but I’m told it’s good.  The only thing I would say is if political correctness is your cup of tea, stay away from this series!  Otherwise, highly recommended.

Stacy W.

 


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Desert Noir by Betty Webb

desert noirLena Jones hears screams and old instincts kick in, even though she is no longer a police officer. She then finds her friend, Clarice Kobe, dead on the floor of Clarice’s art gallery. She had been beaten to death. Clarice’s estranged and abusive husband is arrested for the murder. But then his lawyer asks Lena for her help to prove that his client is innocent. Lena has a hard time believing this because of Clarice’s husband’s past, but she soon finds out that Clarice might not have been the person Lena really thought she was.

In the midst of the murder investigation, Lena interviews many people including a woman who knows something about Lena’s early life. The life Lena only remembers through the scar on her forehead.

I first started Desert Noir (Lena Jones #1) because it was the series of choice for TCPL’s Murder by the Book group’s April read. As I was reading the novel I found myself enthralled with the story. It was fast paced, yet easy to follow. The characters were fun to get to know. Lena’s personality shined through all of the twists and turns of the book. If you like mystery reads, then I would definitely suggest this book and series to you!

Richelle B.


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Red Sister by Mark Lawrence

25895524“It is important, when killing a nun, to ensure that you bring an army of sufficient size. For Sister Thorn of the Sweet Mercy convent Lano Tacsis brought two hundred men.” This is the opening line for Red Sister, by Mark Lawrence, and that one sentence alone gives you a very good idea of the type of tale you are beginning. The story is about Nona, who is saved by the Abbess of Sweet Mercy convent, just before Nona is to be hanged for murder. Nona is nine years old. And therein lies a mystery: how did a nine year old find herself under the shadow of the hangman’s noose? Nona’s story unfolds as she is taken to the Sweet Mercy convent and begins training to be a nun alongside many other girls her age. The nuns live in a dangerous world and Nona, in particular, has made enemies. As Nona learns the skills to be a warrior nun, we learn how she came to be charged with murder in the first place. This is a coming-of-age story as Nona grows and becomes the person she was meant to be. Most of the story takes place at the convent, with its school-like atmosphere. The book reads like a cross between a Harry Potter book and a Wolverine movie. And Nona, in spite of her unusual childhood, upbringing, and her talent for violence, is likeable, kind, and loyal to a fault. The book was a joy to read, and I’m very happy to know that Red Sister is the first book of what will be a trilogy of books. If you like action, drama, and violence set in a fresh, finely crafted fantasy world, then this is the book for you.

Annette G.


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Summer of Blood: England’s First Revolution By Dan Jones

summer of bloodIn June 1381, the people of England, reeling from the ravages of the Black Death and protesting against an unfair Poll Tax and serfdom in general, marched on London  in the first mass uprising in Western society.   After several days of looting, murder and destruction, they believed they had achieved their goals, only to have the tables turned on them by then 14-year-old king Richard II.  Though the revolt was ultimately suppressed and its leaders executed, it was the beginning of the end for the English feudal system, which had vanished entirely by the mid-fifteenth century.  It has also proven a popular literary subject in the centuries since.

The event has been widely studied by academics, but author Jones puts the reader in the center of the action with his mesmerizing account.  Summer of Blood: England’s First Revolution joins the author’s collection of other works on English history, including The Plantagenets, The Wars of the Roses, Magna Carta, and the newly-published The Templars.

Alison M.


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The Redemption of Callie and Kayden by Jessica Sorensen

redemptionJessica Sorensen is known as one of the founding authors for the new genre, New Adult. She doesn’t disappoint in this college age novel, but be forewarned that there are themes of abuse.

Main characters, Callie and Kayden seem to live completely different lives. Callie has been the “freak” for the last 4+ years while Kayden has been the star of the football team. But through a series of events that unfold, we learn that they aren’t so different after all and both are harboring harmful and tragic secrets from the world. The freedom of college allows the both of them to spread their wings and escape the confines of their secrets if only for a little while and the innocent “freak” and football star learn to be more than they once were. With a cast of characters that are both innocently real and heartbreakingly honest and loving, this book and it’s author has become one of my own all time favorites. What will happen when Callie and Kayden decide that enough is enough and the world needs to know? Will they find redemption in each other or in telling their secrets?

The Redemption of Callie and Kayden is the second book in Sorensen’s Coincidence series.

Brittany R.


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Police at the Station and They Don’t Look Friendly by Adrian McKinty

police at the stationI should never have been nervous to read Adrian McKinty’s latest Police at the Station and They Don’t Look Friendly.  The reason I was hesitant was because in McKinty’s last Detective Duffy book, Duffy became seriously involved with a woman named Beth and they had a baby.  In general, in novels and TV shows, I like detectives to be very competent but single and married to the job (or they can be involved with someone if the job comes first).  A lot of times once a significant other is introduced everything goes downhill and everything starts being about the relationship which is not what I want to see or read.  Luckily for me, McKinty pays short attention to the relationship – yeah, Duffy loves her and the kid and would do anything for them blah blah blah but the book is still about a murder and how Duffy and his team start tying it to something that happened 20 years ago that was all but covered up.  I love the way McKinty writes – describing Duffy roughing up a suspect he says he “flung him into the aluminum walls of his house, aluminum that if it had somehow become sentient would no doubt have relished the action, having been in a previous incarnation the panels of a fighter plane…”  Fantastic action when the IRA comes calling to kill him and his family at 3 in the morning – shady Protestant neighbor with an M249 definitely has his back.  So his girl and the baby get bundles off to her parents out of harm’s way, he publicizes that he is moving on to other cases and secretly keeps digging.  His girl starts looking at places for them to move to in Scotland because she is tired of violent Northern Ireland.  I’m hoping that Duffy will tell her to hit the bricks (he can see the kid on weekends) or she is killed in the next installment – he can’t leave Northern Ireland!  Love, love, love this series!
Stacy W.


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