BookClique

Here we will post our musings on a wide variety of titles. You can comment on our posts and find the titles in our catalog.

Behind the Throne by K.B. Wagers

throneHailimi Bristol is a gunrunner on the spaceship Sophie. Hailimi, called Hail, does what gunrunners typically do, and she does it in a daring and clever gunrunner way. She’s smart, sassy, bold, and can fight and shoot with the best of them. Life changes, however, when someone tries to kill her. Before they can finish the job, two Imperial Trackers arrive on the Sophie and snatch Hail away to their own ship. There, they inform her that she is now heir to the throne of Indrana, as her sisters and niece have been murdered and her empress mother is failing. Hail is less than thrilled, as she had never planned to go back to the regimented, claustrophobic life of royal princess. Reluctantly, she returns, and finds her life almost immediately in peril. Clearly, something is rotten in the heart of the Indranan Empire. Hail must use her gunrunner skills as she tries to uncover who is behind the plot against the throne.

Behind the Throne will appeal to Star Wars fans, as well as those who love a good space opera. If the politics and plotting behind the throne are your thing, a better title might be The Goblin Emperor by Katherine Addison. If you like your action fast and furious, then Behind the Throne is for you.

Annette G.


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Revolver by Duane Swierczynski

revolverDuane Swierczynski’s  Revolver follows the Walczak family (especially those who serve as police officers) during 3 distinct time periods: 1965, 1995, and 2015.  The setting is Philadelphia – particularly the working class and poorer areas of the city.  In 1965 there were quite a few race riots and officer Stan Walczak’s partner is hurt on the job during one.   He is then paired with an African American officer who is a real firebrand about wanting to clean up corruption and weed out dirty cops.  Not surprisingly this does not go over well and the two officers become targets.  Eventually they are killed but by who?  In 1995 Stan’s son Jim is working as a homicide detective and thinks he knows the identity of his father’s murderer.  He keeps working the case, plotting revenge and stalking the killer.  In 2015 Jim’s daughter Audrey is failing college and on a lark proposes to look into her grandpa’s murder as a last ditch effort to keep herself from being kicked out of school.  Her professor agrees and as she investigates she realizes her father might have had it all wrong….Very good.

Stacy W


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Pretty Girls by Karin Slaughter

pretty girlsMore than twenty years ago, beautiful nineteen year-old Julia Scott disappears into the night, never to be seen again. With no clues and no body, the mystery of what happened to her haunts her family still. Her two remaining sisters, Clare and Lydia, are estranged; Clare is married and rich, and Lydia is poor with a teenage daughter. When Clare’s husband, Paul, is murdered in a robbery, it is as if she has stepped into an episode of “The Twilight Zone.” The authorities and their questions are more than creepy, and with a sense of foreboding, Clare starts to look harder at the details of her husband’s life. What she finds begins to terrify her, and without knowing who to turn to, she turns to her sister, Lydia, for help. The two of them must put aside their differences in order to figure out why Clare is becoming the target for some truly frightening attention.
The last Karin Slaughter book I read was the brilliant Cop Town, which is a character driven police procedural set in the 1970s. I loved the fast pacing of that particular book. Pretty Girls has an entirely different pace and structure. Pretty Girls gives you the point of view of the family surrounding Julia Scott as they ponder the mystery of her disappearance, and then, you see the rest of the story unfold through the eyes of Clare and Lydia as they work together to figure out the strangeness of Paul’s life. The tension ratchets up a little more with each chapter, and soon, you literally can’t stop turning pages.

For me, I still prefer a book like Cop Town, for its fast moving story. Pretty Girls started a little slow for me, but it will likely appeal to fans of Gone Girl and Girl on the Train. I enjoyed the dynamics between the two sisters; Ms. Slaughter always writes the most compelling female characters.

Annette G.


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Kitchen Hacks by America’s Test Kitchen

kitchen hacksIf any of you are familiar with the Cook’s Illustrated and/or Cook’s Country magazines you will be familiar with the shortcuts and tips in every issue.  America’s Test Kitchen has now put together hundreds of these for their book Kitchen Hacks.  Some tips are things I would never have thought of, some are ones I should have thought of, and some I will never use but it is still interesting to browse all the sections of the book.  One I should’ve thought of:  when pouring liquid from a pan that is to go back on your stove burner it seems like there’s always a drip that goes down the outside of the pan.  Well, instead of turning the pan right side up after pouring out the contents, continue to turn the pan (so one full rotation) until it ends up right side up.  Any drips would then be on the inside of the pan!  I cannot believe I have never thought of that.  This book is divided into sections for cleaning, food storage, reheating, substitutions, and food prep, etc.  My only beef with the book is the word “hack” because I feel like it’s one of those trendy terms right now that everyone’s using (am I the only one who gnashes her teeth when  I hear “at the end of the day” or “hashtag” or various other overused words?).  Anyway, as with just about everything America’s Test Kitchen puts out, this book is golden.

Stacy W.


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False Hearts by Laura Lam

false-heartsTila and Taema are born with one heart–conjoined twins living in a cult which bans technology after 1969. Tila, the bold one. Taema, the meek one. Both are very, very clever. When the twins discover the medical miracles of the outside world, they plot their escape. Once free, they are separated, able to live apart due to their new, mechanical hearts. Ten uneventful years pass as they enjoy life in a peaceful, technically advanced society. Then, Tila arrives at Taema’s apartment covered in blood. Accused of murder, Tila is arrested, and it is up to Taema to clear her name. Pulled into the investigation by the police, Taema poses as her sister to uncover the secrets of the city’s underground. And the secrets she finds lead back to her past, and to the cult she came from. Set in a futuristic city, this is a story of love, obsession, drugs, greed, and murder. Taema must find her courage so she can clear her sister’s name. Past and future converge as the clues Taema discovers lead her closer to the truth.

False Hearts is an unusual book. Part sci-fi, part mystery, the author weaves a complex tale. Not only do you get to know Tila and Taema well, but you also see both of their worlds: the world of the cult from their past, and the modern world in their present. Laura Lam’s novel is gripping and fresh. I look forward to seeing what she writes next.

Annette G.


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Finale by Thomas Mallon

FINALEjacketWith the interest in all things 80s these days, Finale by Thomas Mallon should be an extremely popular read.  A fictionalized account of the Reagan years, it’s got all the players – the Reagans, Moynihan, O’Neill, Dole, Iran-Contra, perestroika, Just say No, etc., etc.  Always a political junkie, I really, really enjoyed this book.  Geez, I remember being just a young’un at the time-being so annoyed at Tipper Gore and her Parents Music Resource Center.  Here we are years later and the artist she deemed was so awful – Prince – we just lost and even our president has mourned his passing.  Mallon skips around so you read different points of view from Democrat to Republican, people with high status and lower echelon workers.  If you lived through these times and followed the news or at least follow political history you will love this book.  Now I think I’ll read his previous book Watergate and enjoy reading about G. Gordon Liddy and the gang!

Stacy W.


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The Woman in Cabin 10 by Ruth Ware

woman-in-cabin-10Lo Blacklock is looking forward to her next writing assignment as a travel journalist. She is to be a guest aboard the Aurora, a luxury ship with only room for a few select passengers. But before she can leave on her trip, her life is threatened by a home invasion and she has a huge fight with her boyfriend. By the time she boards the ship, she’s off-kilter and trying to make the best of the situation. The guests all seem to have secret agendas or secrets of their own. Lo tries to get serious about her assignment, but one evening, she hears a splash and sees someone or something fall into the ocean from the cabin next door. Yet, no one seems to know anything about a woman in that cabin when Lo raises the alarm. Lo’s tension turns to fear as she tries to investigate the event on her own.

I enjoyed Ruth Ware’s previous title, In a Dark, Dark Wood. The Woman in Cabin 10 has a similar feel to it, trapping the reader in a closed door, character driven mystery. Fans of Agatha Christie will particularly enjoy this book as while the mystery is twisty, it is not graphic nor gory. The setting–the cruise ship–was fresh and fun, though I do admit I liked the creepy forest setting from the first book just a wee bit better.

Annette G.


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Meathead: the Science of Great Barbecue and Grilling by Meathead Goldwyn

meatheadJust in time for the grilling season Meathead Goldwyn (amazingribs.com) has come out with Meathead: the Science of Great Barbecue and Grilling.  I always like science mixed in with my cookbooks (which is why I love America’s Test Kitchen books and magazines) because there are a lot of beliefs out there related to baking and cooking that turn out to be false when experiments are done.  It’s fun to see someone make recipes in several different ways over and over to prove or disprove something.  I would actually do this in my own kitchen but would go broke –I don’t want to buy 6 different expensive prime rib roasts to experiment on, I need to get it right the first time!  For example, one of the experiments was about whether or not steaks and roasts need to “rest” after cooking (it is supposed to help them retain their juices).  So they cooked rib eyes and cut into one immediately and one got to rest.  They repeated the experiment many times and the difference ended up being only one teaspoon more of juices lost from the one cut right away!  I’m going to eat my steak fresh and hot from the grill now like I’ve always preferred to. With roasts the difference was one ounce more of juice lost if it was cut into immediately-again not as big a deal as we have been led to believe.  Another myth dispelled is that the pink juice from your rare steak is blood.  I love my steak rare and always get to hear how gross that is and some people can’t stand to see blood on plates.  Well, guess what?  It’s not blood, it’s called myowater – in other words, juice.  If it was blood it would be darker and coagulate on the plate!  And here I’ve thought that I just loved the taste of blood when I really just love the taste of meat juice!  Lots of great recipes inside.

Stacy W.


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Charlotte Bronte: A Fiery Heart by Claire Harman

bronte“There’s a fire and a fury raging in that little woman and scorching her heart,” author William Makepeace Thackeray observed of Charlotte Brontë. “She has a story and a great grief that has gone badly with her.”

Bronte did have a sad life, albeit one of magnificent creativity. Losing her mother in childhood and all of her five siblings before her own early death at age 38, the author most famous for Jane Eyre suffered for years from an unrequited love for her Brussels instructor Constantin Heger and could not help resenting the conventions of the day that necessitated both her and her sisters Emily and Anne adopting male pseudonyms in order to publish their first novels.

The author of this new biography (published just in time for the bicentennial of Charlotte Bronte’s birth) manages to bring a fresh view and on occasion a mildly wry sense of humor to the story of Charlotte Bronte and her famously gifted and socially awkward family. The focus is on Bronte’s relationships with her family, friends and publishers, and the author doesn’t shy away from illustrating her subject’s social and occupational idiosyncrasies and repressed anger and grief at her professional and personal situation The high quality of the author’s research allows her to illustrate effectively relations of themes in Bronte’s work to events occurring in her life at the time of their composition.

Readers familiar with Bronte’s life and work will particularly enjoy revisiting both in this engaging book, Charlotte Bronte: A Fiery Heart by Claire Harman.

Alison M.


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How to Eat in the Woods by Bradford Angier

eat in woodsHow to eat in the woods : a complete guide to foraging, trapping, fishing, and finding sustenance in the wild by Bradford Angier is one of the best survival guides I’ve ever read.  This is not a book about what is edible to add to your salad from the forest or how to live in an isolated area where you can only get to the store every month or so.  This is “I’m in the middle of nowhere with no food or water for days what do I do?”  If you are starving and dehydrated, don’t eat!  You will only dehydrate yourself further.  If the only item available is lean meat, don’t eat!  You can die from eating only lean meat after a few days (Who knew?  Apparently outdoorsy people up north know this).  Unless you know what you’re doing, avoid mushrooms altogether – don’t even bother trying to identify them with a guidebook.  The book also covers various ways to make a fire, make traps and snares, skinning and butchering, making weapons and stealing fresh kills from wolves, coyotes, or bears (!). Very interesting.

Stacy W.


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Tippecanoe County Public Library * 627 South Street * Lafayette, IN * 47901 * 765 429-0100